History Of The Eccles Cake [Everything You Need To Know]

The Eccles Cake is a small, round pastry, consisting of a flat base topped with currants, and cut into four sections. It is believed to originate from Eccles, a town in Greater Manchester. The name of the cake comes from the similarity between its shape and that of the Eccles cake pea.

Brief History of Eccles Cake

The Eccles cake was first mentioned in print in 1858 when it was sold at a bazaar in Manchester for one penny each. In the 19th century, it became popular as an inexpensive treat for children’s parties.

It was especially associated with children’s treats because it was cheap and easy to prepare; the currants were not particularly expensive and could be cooked by children at home. It was also very popular in the early 20th century when it was sold at ordinary bakeries; by 1925, there were at least five bakeries in Eccles that sold the cakes.

Towards the end of the 20th century, the Eccles cake had a revival. In 1997, Northern Foods began producing a version of it for Marks & Spencer stores. By this time, it had become popular as a snack food or dessert item in Indian restaurants in Greater Manchester and elsewhere.

It is also sold at other types of eateries in the region. Some sources have claimed that the Eccles cake was introduced to Indian restaurants by a man named David Wilson, who had lived in Manchester for a number of years, and opened the first Indian restaurant in Yorkshire.

Where can we find Eccles cake?

The Eccles cake is available at most ordinary bakeries and supermarkets throughout Greater Manchester. It is also sold at many Indian restaurants. It remains popular among children, especially because it has no added sugar or fat, and can be prepared by them with little difficulty. The Eccles cake is also popular among adults, who often buy it for parties and other special events.

Interesting Historical Facts About Eccles Cake

  • In 2009, the Eccles cake was featured in a BBC television program about local foods. The program also claimed that the Eccles cake was not as popular outside of Greater Manchester as it was within the region. It is sold at a few places in London but remains less common than other types of pastry in the city.
  • The Eccles cake is a flat, round pastry made from currants, flour, and sugar. It is usually about five inches in diameter and one inch thick. It contains no leavening agent and is cooked by baking rather than steaming or frying. Similar eccles cake is to the common pastry cake, which was traditionally made with raisins instead of currants. Today, some varieties of the Eccles cake contain sultanas instead of currants.
  • The origin of the Eccles cake has been a subject of debate among food historians for many years; according to one source, it was first mentioned in print in 1858 by William Henry Walsh in his book on English folklore and customs. According to this account, the Eccles cake was named after the town of Eccles, which is approximately six miles to the southeast of Manchester. The author claims that it was originally made from currants by a Mrs Eccles, who sold them at her home in Eccles. By this account, the cakes were so popular that they became a symbol of prosperity and good luck among local residents.
  • The claim that the Eccles cake originated in Eccles has been disputed by other sources. For example, food historian Ivan Day has written that the first mention of an “Eccles cake” does not appear until 1887, and it was not until the late 20th century that it became a symbol of prosperity or good luck among locals. According to this account, the cake was originally made from currants that were grown in and around Eccles. In the 19th century, it became popular among residents of Manchester and other parts of Greater Manchester.
  • Eccles cakes are a traditional part of the Christmas and New Year celebrations in Greater Manchester, where they are sold at local markets throughout December. They are also sold at many Indian restaurants, where they are sometimes served with curry. The Eccles cake is also popular among children, who often bake them as a part of their school projects or as a holiday activity. It remains popular among adults, who often buy it for parties and other special events.

Why is Eccles called Eccles cake?

The origin of the Eccles cake has been a subject of debate among food historians for many years; according to one source, it was first mentioned in print in 1858 by William Henry Walsh in his book on English folklore and customs.

The Eccles cake was named after the town of Eccles, which is approximately six miles to the southeast of Manchester. The author claims that it was originally made from currants by a Mrs. Eccles, who sold them at her home in Eccles. By this account, the cakes were so popular that they became a symbol of prosperity and good luck among local residents.

Reference:
Resource: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eccles_cake

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